24 May, 2017

Tour

The North Yorkshire County Record Office in Northallerton has operated since 1949.

It now has some 10 miles of shelving, much of it in locked strong-rooms with fire proof doors.

Even the corridors are used for storage.

Even the corridors are used for storage.

 

 

The rooms are off a long corridor, pictured on the left,  which is also used as a storage area. Both this and the rooms are kept at an optimum temperature for the preservation of the wide variety of documents.

After handing over the parish parchments, John Lund was taken on a tour of the facilities.   He was very impressed and totally confident that the Broughton’s historical documents would now be very well cared for.

 

 

 

 

Meeting the Conservator

 

John Lund (left) has further damage pointed out by Rachel Greenwood, Conservator.

John Lund (left) has further damage pointed out by Rachel Greenwood, Conservator.

 

During his tour of the Archives,  John was introduced to Conservator Rachel Greenwood. She confirmed the parchments were only slightly damaged, adding they needed just a light clean with a couple of minor repairs before they were ready to be put into storage.

John was also shown the camera used for photographing documents which can then be saved into a format suitable for storing digitally.

County Record Office

The County Record Office  is responsible for the collection and preservation of millions of documents which create a wealth of archive material relating to the history of the North Yorkshire County.

These include the archives of hundreds of landed families and individuals as well as institutions, parish registers and church records since the 12C. There are also the archives of district, borough and parish councils as well as the North Riding Registry of Deeds.

The Archive can be used to get information for personal, legal, administrative and historical purposes, such as tracing ancestors; family history and genealogy; tracing ownership of property; determining the status of rights of way; discovering the position of boundaries; and helping people to understand life, work and people in the past.

These can be viewed by anyone making a visit to the Malpas Road offices. While viewing the documents is free, charges have to be made where for example, requests are made for copies.

 

Futher photos are below.

John Lund, left, checks damage with Rachel Greenwood, Conservator.

John Lund, left, checks damage with Rachel Greenwood, Conservator.

 

Photographer Richard Jemison checks the lighting.

Photographer Richard Jemison checks the lighting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For further information email: archives@northyorks.gov.uk

or visit the  NYCC website

AGW 2011

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